Friday, 30 September 2016

Small Business Event Planning Guide-IV

bookmystall, event guide, event management, event organization, Event Planning, event tips, Small Business Event Planning


Always underestimate turnout, for sponsors.

If you think you can get 100 attendees, base your sponsorship pitch on a lower estimate — especially if this is your first event. It’s better to give sponsors a pleasant surprise than a disappointing one.

Ask people what they think, and be ready for feedback good or bad.

Ask for critiques. If you’ve done half a decent job, you’ll get lots of kudos. Say thanks, but then ask for the CRITIQUE and be ready for it.

Have a skilled social media team cover your event.
 Don’t forget a social media team. While not imperative for every event or industry, more and more events are focusing on harnessing the viral power of their audience. If your audience is tweeting, Facebooking and taking pictures on Instagram — you should be doing the same and you will need a trained team to execute.

Look for vendors who serve your niche and are willing to get involved.

The best vendors you can work with are those who are familiar with small business culture. Look for vendors who work with small businesses frequently or who would get involved on a bigger level than their role.

Set expectations carefully – then deliver.

Ensure that the audience has a GREAT (not good) experience; and that you give them what they expected from attending.

Attitude is contagious.

Your guests in large part will play off your attitude and dynamics during the event. Lead by example and have a good time.

Let crowd reaction be your barometer.

Read the audience during the event. Ask people how they are doing. If things are going great, and if they are not, you’ll know.


Always ask yourself:

 How is this relevant to attendees?  Make sure you are offering content that is relevant to over 80% of the audience. The audience must walk away with tangible tactics to improve their business and career … and they must feel the speaker’s energy. Speaking about your business and what you do — without offering the audience what THEY need — is a waste of time and money for all.

As the master of ceremonies or a speaker – practice. 

You know your business, but do not assume that you know how to put on a presentation. Practice giving your presentation, answering questions and handling difficult and confrontational members of the audience. The more prepared you are the better.

Look your best.

Look the part… be comfortable but fashion forward. Even if you are an accountant or lawyer, choose your most distinctive suit or tie. People remember how comfortable you are in your own skin.

Imagine the event, step by step, and make a 2-column list:

 what could go wrong in one column, and your contingency plan in the second.  Be prepared for the unexpected. Maybe the sound system fails. Maybe your keynote presenter bails. Can you cope and move on?

 Be ready to lend a hand to fill any gaps.

 Although planning ahead is a great formula for success, it is never enough. Something unexpected always comes up. Thus, it pays to put in a little extra elbow grease for extenuating circumstances. This applies to catering arrangements, printing requirements, guest accommodations, weather forecasts, entertainment and more.

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